Active transport modeling

Membrane Transport Activity

Developed by:  Donna Koslowsky
Modifications:  Jon Stoltzfus

Learning Objective:

"Students will be able to describe how active transport can move molecules across a biological membrane."

Textbook: Campbell 9e; Chapter 7 Membrane Structure and Function

Connection to Vision and Change*
Core Concepts
2. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION:
Biological systems are built using combinations of subunits that drive increasingly diverse and dynamic phyisiological responses in living organisms. Understanding the relationships between biological structure and function.

Core Competencies
1. ABILITY TO APPLY THE PROCESS OF SCIENCE and 2. ABILITY TO USE MODELING AND SIMULATION.
Developing problem-solving strategies.


*Vision and Change: A Call to Action. Washington, DC: AAAS; 2010.  www.visionandchange.org/VC_report.pdf. 

Description

Students were assigned homework that introduced Biological membranes.  This activity was designed to follow a short minilecture on primary active transport and the Na/K pump.  The students are asked to work in groups to draw a vesicle with the Na/K pump oriented with the ATP binding site on outside.  They are then asked to answer a series of clicker questions.

In our initial use of this activity, we did not have the students work together to draw out the vesicle; we found that they were not able to accurately visualize the experimental set-up so as to be able to answer the clicker questions.  Adding the step of having them draw/model the system should solve this problem.

Associated Questions

AttachmentSize
Only slides for model activity and clicker questions195.96 KB
AttachmentSize
Full lecture: includes both lecture slides and activity1.48 MB

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This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (DUE grants: 1438739, 1323162, 1347740, 0736952 and 1022653). Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF.